8 Natural Fabric Softener Alternatives for Better Laundry Days

If you’re looking for a way to make your clothes feel soft and reduce static cling without using harsh chemicals, then you’re in the right place. In this article, we’ll explore some of the most popular alternatives to fabric softeners, such as vinegar, wool dryer balls, baking soda, and a one-of-a-kind homemade fabric softener. We’ll also discuss the benefits of each option so that you can decide which one is best for you. So, let’s get started and discover the perfect fabric softener alternative for your laundry!

DIY Homemade Fabric Softener

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of hair conditioner- any type
  • 3 cups of white distilled vinegar
  • 6 cups of room-temperature water

Instructions:

  1. In a large bowl, mix together the hair conditioner and white vinegar until well combined.
  2. Add the water and stir until the mixture is completely blended.
  3. Transfer the fabric softener into a large container with a lid, such as a gallon-sized jug or a plastic container.
  4. To use, simply add 1/4 to 1/2 cup of the fabric softener to your washing machine’s fabric softener dispenser or during the rinse cycle.
  5. Stir the fabric softener mixture before each use to ensure it is evenly distributed.

Note: You can customize the scent of your fabric softener by using a scented hair conditioner or adding a few drops of your favorite essential oil to the mixture. Also, keep in mind that this fabric softener recipe may not be suitable for use on all types of fabric, so it’s always a good idea to test a small area first before using it on a larger scale.

5 Reasons to Ditch Fabric Softeners Now!

 

If you are still looking for fabric softener alternatives, here are some options:

 

 

  1. Vinegar: Adding a cup of white vinegar to the rinse cycle can help soften fabric and reduce static cling.
  2. Baking soda: Adding a half cup of baking soda to the rinse cycle can help neutralize odors and soften fabric.
  3. Wool dryer balls: These are reusable balls that you can add to your dryer to soften fabric and reduce static cling. You can even add a few drops of essential oil to the balls for a fresh scent.
  4. Aluminum foil: Crumpling up a sheet of aluminum foil and adding it to the dryer can help reduce static cling.
  5. Dryer sheets: While technically a fabric softener, dryer sheets can be used in small amounts to achieve a similar effect. You can also make your own dryer sheets by soaking a cloth in a mixture of fabric softener and water.
  6. Liquid fabric softener alternatives: There are a variety of liquid fabric softener alternatives on the market that use plant-based ingredients or essential oils to soften fabric without the use of harsh chemicals.
  7. Air drying Racks: Skipping the dryer altogether and air drying your clothes can help them retain their softness and reduce static cling.

 

 

Safe to Use on Most Fabrics

  • Vinegar: Vinegar is safe to use on all types of fabric, including cotton, wool, silk, and synthetic fibers.
  • Baking soda: Baking soda is safe to use on most types of fabric, including cotton, polyester, and synthetic blends. However, it may not be suitable for delicate fabrics such as silk or wool.
  • Wool dryer balls: Wool dryer balls are safe to use on most types of fabric, including cotton, wool, and synthetic blends.
  • Aluminum foil: Aluminum foil is safe to use on most types of fabric, including cotton, polyester, and synthetic blends.
  • Dryer sheets: Dryer sheets are safe to use on most types of fabric, including cotton, polyester, and synthetic blends.
  • Liquid fabric softener alternatives: Most liquid fabric softener alternatives are safe to use on all types of fabric, but it’s always a good idea to check the label for any specific instructions or limitations.
  • Air drying: Air drying is generally safe for all types of fabric, although some delicate fabrics such as silk may require special care.

 

Conclusion

In a nutshell, there are plenty of fabric softener alternatives that are better for your clothes and the environment. Whether you choose to use vinegar, baking soda, wool dryer balls, or even make your own fabric softener, you’ll still get the same soft and static-free results. So go ahead and try out some of these alternatives – your clothes (and the planet) will thank you!